Rice farmers make long-term decisions based on many factors, some including uncertain market conditions and adverse weather.  As a tool for making effective and lasting choices with these factors in mind, farmers use risk management provisions provided through the Farm Bill, such as commodity support programs and crop insurance. 

The current Farm Bill provides a modest safety-net for farmers who must contend with depressed prices, increased costs of production, thin margins, and revenue losses due to natural disasters.  As we approach the current farm legislation’s expiration date, the 2018 Farm Bill should be a multi-year re-authorization for a period of not less than five years and fully fund all titles, including the commodity, conservation, trade, and crop insurance titles.

Additionally, Congress should provide for emergency-designated, ad hoc disaster assistance as warranted by natural disasters.

Recent News

  • Farmers.gov logo, website url and text "Grow With Us" on background of photo of red onions in a wooden, blue crate New Features Improve Delivery of USDA Tech Tools

    Apr 11, 2019

    Last week, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has launched two new features on farmers.gov to help farmers manage loans and apply for H-2A visas. The new features streamline two processes that are spread across multiple agencies and simplify a process that can be complex for customers. Full story
  • WASDE Report Released

    Apr 09, 2019

    The outlook for 2018/19 U.S. rice this month is for reduced exports, unchanged domestic and residual use, and higher ending stocks. Full story
  • Text "Conservation Stewardship Program" superimposed over photo of green grass field next to dirt road next to field of brown stalks USDA Allowing Some One-Year CSP Extensions

    Mar 22, 2019

    Farmers with expiring Conservation Stewardship Program contracts are being notified that they can sign up for an additional year of payments. Eligible contract holders should get a letter from the Natural Resources Conservation Service by April 8. Full story