U.S. food crops, including rice, are held to very strict food safety and pesticide residue standards by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Imported crops and food products are held to various standards by their origin country and/or Codex Alimentarius (CODEX) which are often not be as stringent as U.S. standards. U.S. food safety standards should be enforced for domestic and imported food equally.

Rice is a grain, not a shape. That means that food and products using the word “rice” in their description and marketing must contain or be derived from rice or wild rice. Rice is defined as whole and broken kernels obtained from the species Oryza sativa L, wild rice are four species of grasses from the genus Zizania. should use the word rice in their name. Consumers are faced with many choices and advice when it comes to making food purchasing decisions, we believe that labels and terms that are misleading to consumers should not be used. 

We support a risk-based approach to establishing domestic and global standards for food safety and commerce and as an industry we strive to provide consumers assurance that U.S. rice and rice products meet or exceed the food safety standards in place by FDA and CODEX. 

Recent News

  • New WOTUS Rule Available for Comment

    Feb 21, 2019

    A new rule was published last Wednesday, February 13, to revise the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Army Corps of Engineers definition of what is considered a Waters of the United States (WOTUS) under the Clean Water Act. Full story
  • Revised Definition of Waters of the U.S. Announced

    Dec 13, 2018

    At a public event held Tuesday at EPA headquarters, EPA’s Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler announced the imminent publication of a new definition for Water of the United States (WOTUS) under the Clean Water Act to replace the 2015 WOTUS rule. Full story
  • Rice Matters at FDA Discussion

    Nov 09, 2018

    Last week the Mississippi Farm Bureau hosted Dr. Stephen Ostroff, deputy commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for an agricultural roundtable to discuss a range of recent FDA regulations. Full story